As organisations become more sophisticated in their use of analytical data, one of the biggest challenges is knowing how to incorporate those insights into decisions about people; who to recruit and how to get the best out of them.

Businesses often make poor hiring decisions because they rely too much on intuition and other subjective, less-valid forms of assessment. Intuition can play a role in decision making, but it needs to be considered alongside other objectively measurable data. Without the insight and clarity that comes from objective measurement, organisational strategies end up no more than an optimistic shot in the dark.

Here are PeopleScape’s 5 Tips to help HR get the most out of psychological assessments for recruitment:

1. Does the tool really predict performance in the job? The most important thing to look for in any assessment tool for recruitment is “predictive validity” – i.e. how accurately does the tool predict future performance and/or behaviour (note: the best tools have a correlation with future performance of around .5 whereas the average to good tools are around .3 and poor tools are below this); so make sure you get this data given to you for any tool you use for recruitment and selection

2. The “so what” factor: you may use a tool that is a good predictor of performance but if you do not use a provider that can help you clearly interpret the results and what they mean for you, then you may be none the wiser. To help you understand exactly what this means for the likely on-the-job performance of the candidate then you need someone who can interpret the results for your context otherwise you may be making a poor decision. Ensure you use well qualified and commercial psychologists to help make the best decisions

3. Data Integration: no test is perfect at predicting future job performance; interviews are not perfect; CVs are often not accurate and reference checks are also very flawed; so given this you can increase your chances of getting it right by integrating the data from all these sources; one of the best ways to use psychological assessments is to use it between the first and last interviews so that you can probe into potential areas for development or weaknesses in the final interview to help make your final decision

4. Cognitive or ‘abilities’ tests: to enhance the likelihood that you will “get it right” it is best to use a combination of cognitive tests (verbal, numerical and abstract) as well as behaviour style profiles; cognitive tests when used together are more effective at predicting future performance with a correlation of about .5; when used with a highly predictive personality or behaviour style profile (around .5) you significantly increase the likelihood that you will ‘get it right’

5. Flexibility to use the right test for the right roles: you are best to use an assessment company that is not also a test publisher because you need the flexibility to be able to use the right tool for each different set of roles rather than using the same tool for all your recruitment needs; one size does not fit all roles and companies that sell tests as well as test interpretation may not be truly independent and free from bias when selecting the right tool for the job

To discuss your assessment needs and how to ensure you are getting the most out of your assessment process, contact PeopleScape today.

Finding and selecting the right people at an organisation is often one of the most important responsibilities that a leader will have, and interviewing candidates will almost always be a key component of the recruitment process. Unfortunately, there’s no exact formula to choose the perfect candidate or predict how successful they will be.

There is strong research however that does show that some interview techniques can increase the effectiveness of the interview process:

  • Use a structured interview and rating system. Several studies on assessment methods, including most famously by Hunter and Schmidt, have shown that using set questions as part of a structured interview drastically increases your ability to choose the right candidate. While it might feel more natural to “have a chat” and that can form part of the discussion, it’s important to have pre-prepared questions that are consistent across candidates and a system of being able to rate responses.
  • Questions should be “competency-based”. Past behaviour is one of the best predictors of future behaviour, and competency-based questions ask a candidate about how they’ve approached real scenarios in the past. Questions like “tell me about a time when you built an effective work relationship” will tell you more about someone’s approach than asking them to describe how they would do it hypothetically.
  • Use additional tools. Hunter and Schmidt’s research also tells us that the ability to predict candidate success also increases by selective use of other tools in the recruitment process. Carefully chosen intellectual ability tests and personality questionnaires can help validate interview responses and also provide areas that should be probed in an interview.

    Correlation coefficients between test & future performance

 

 

 

 

 

  • Be aware of interviewer bias. You may have heard of unconscious bias related to a candidate’s gender, race or age and it’s important to take steps to counteract the effects of bias. For example, some larger organisations remove candidate names from CVs. There are also other biases that can affect interviewers such as “confirmation bias” where an interviewer has an existing belief about someone and they put greater emphasis on things that support that belief and less emphasis on things that don’t. The first step to minimising bias is identifying any bias you may have and then address the effect this may have on the interview.
Contact a PeopleScape consultant about your Recruitment Interview strategy today.

When thinking about enhancing your assessment for recruitment capability, ensure you look at new and innovative assessment tools such as technology-based gamification tools along with the technical evidence to ensure the tools have high levels of predictive validity.

In recent years there has been a surge in technology-based gamification tools on the market. Many large organisations are looking for innovative ways to recruit particularly for the graduate recruitment market so we often get asked: “what is the latest in assessment tools?”

Using gamification-based tools to assess cognitive capacity is something we’ve seen more of lately. The advantage of using tools like this is that it gives the impression that your company is innovative and creative and at the forefront of thought leadership. The face validity of these types of tools can be quite high and they can seem very impressive. For these reasons, for the right candidate groups (such as graduates) we would encourage you to look into these tools.

However, because these tools are still emerging and are very new, most have not been through a rigorous validation process and so the predictive validity of these tools is low, particularly around cognitive capacity. PeopleScape suggest that you use a combination of newer gamification-based tools (for the right audiences) and evidence-based and well-researched tools where high levels of predictive validity have been proven.

Contact PeopleScape today to discuss your recruitment process and review whether the tools you are currently using have the best predictive validity on the market.

 

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